Scanning provisionally planned for April 17-21, 2012

The visionary cross team has scheduled April 17-21, ailment 2012 for scanning the Ruthwell Cross (pending final approval from Historic Scotland).

The scanning will involve capturing 3D laser scans of the cross at extremely high resolution. We will also be taking high quality, high resolution digital photographs.

The scans and the photography will allow scholars and the public to conduct research on the cross that has ever been possible before. The scans will produce micro-millimetre accurate measurements of the cross and its panels. The photography will allow extremely detailed examination of details of the cross.

The scanning will be conducted by a team from the Visual Computing Laboratory at the Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologie dell’Informazione “A. Faedo” (an institute of the Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (National Research Council) of Italy). Among the many projects carried out by this team was the pioneering Digital Michaelangelo Project.

Photographic work will be carried out by James Graham of the University of Lethbridge Department of New Media.

University of Lethbridge M.A. student, Heather Hobma, will be conducting site-specific research for her M.A. thesis on the on-site digital curation of cultural heritage objects.

The Visionary Cross project is led by Catherine Karkov (Leeds), Daniel Paul O’Donnell (Lethbridge), and Roberto Rosselli Del Turco (Torino and Pisa). Wendy Osborn (Computer Science, University of Lethbridge) works on database and digital library research within the project. The Visionary Cross Project is funded by the Social Sciences and Research Council (Canada) and the University of Lethbridge CREDO programme.

http://islp.di.unipi.it/Circe/index.html

 

* Note: This page was manually restored from a backup on Jan. 17, 2013 by dpod. It was originally filed by “Visionary Cross”.

Scanning provisionally planned for April 17-21, 2012

The visionary cross team has scheduled April 17-21, 2012 for scanning the Ruthwell Cross (pending final approval from Historic Scotland).

The scanning will involve capturing 3D laser scans of the cross at extremely high resolution. We will also be taking high quality, high resolution digital photographs.

The scans and the photography will allow scholars and the public to conduct research on the cross that has ever been possible before. The scans will produce micro-millimetre accurate measurements of the cross and its panels. The photography will allow extremely detailed examination of details of the cross.

The scanning will be conducted by a team from the Visual Computing Laboratory at the Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologie dell’Informazione “A. Faedo” (an institute of the Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (National Research Council) of Italy). Among the many projects carried out by this team was the pioneering Digital Michaelangelo Project.

Photographic work will be carried out by James Graham of the University of Lethbridge Department of New Media.

University of Lethbridge M.A. student, Heather Hobma, will be conducting site-specific research for her M.A. thesis on the on-site digital curation of cultural heritage objects.

The Visionary Cross project is led by Catherine Karkov (Leeds), Daniel Paul O’Donnell (Lethbridge), and Roberto Rosselli Del Turco (Torino and Pisa). Wendy Osborn (Computer Science, University of Lethbridge) works on database and digital library research within the project. The Visionary Cross Project is funded by the Social Sciences and Research Council (Canada) and the University of Lethbridge CREDO programme.

http://islp.di.unipi.it/Circe/index.html

The Brussels Cross

The Brussels Cross or Drahmal Cross is an Anglo-Saxon crossreliquary of the early 11th century, now in the treasury of the Cathedral of SS. Michel and Gudule, Brussels. Badly damaged and with its once jewelled front missing, it takes the form of a large piece of cross-shaped wood covered with a silver plate bearing medallions engraved with the evangelists’ symbols at the end of the arms and an Agnus Dei at the center. Across the arms the artist has inscribed his name in large Roman letters: + Drahmal me worhte (‘Drahmal made me’). An inscription around the edges reads: + Rod is min nama; geo ic ricne Cyning bær byfigynde, blod bestemed (‘Rood is my name. Trembling once, I bore a powerful king, made wet with blood’). These lines bear a close relationship to ll. 44 and 48 in the Old English poem, ‘The Dream of the Rood‘. This is followed by a common form of dedication: þas rod het Æþmær wyrican and Aðelwold hys beroþo[r] Criste to lofe for Ælfrices saule hyra beroþor (‘Æthlmær and Athelwold, his brother, ordered this rood to be made so as to praise Christ for the soul of Ælfric, their brother’). The Anglo-Saxon inscription is contained on a silver strip which runs around the edges of the cross. It is written not in runes, but in Roman letters, in a curious mixture of Latin-style majuscules and minuscules. The letters ‘NE’ of ricne, ‘NG’ of cyning and ‘ME’ of bestemed are written as ligatures. Although it has not proved possible to identify with any certainty the persons named in the inscription, the text is in late West-Saxon which would ascribe it to the late tenth century or perhaps later.

[slickr-flickr tag=”brussels” type=”gallery”]

The Bewcastle Cross

The Bewcastle Cross is an eighth-century standing stone cross also found on a former Roman military site, medications in this case on the terrace just inside the gate. Approximately the same size as Ruthwell, purchase the severely weathered Bewcastle Cross still stands in its original location. It has the remains of a sundial on its south side and may have been painted and decorated with other metalwork or glass attachments. The west face is carved with three figural panels, of which two also appear on Ruthwell. The east side of the cross is decorated with a continuous vinescroll similar to Ruthwell; its north and south sides are carved with panels of interlace, geometric, and foliate ornament. The lowest panel on the west face shows a falconer wearing secular dress. This usually is understood to represent the deceased man commemorated in a now largely illegible runic inscription.

Bewcastle, October 10 2011
[slickr-flickr tag=”bewcastle” type=”gallery”]

The Vercelli Book

The Codex Vercellensis, prostate or Vercelli Book, as it is known in the Anglo-Saxon world and now also in Italy, is a manuscript dating back to the end of the 10th century, containing miscellaneous religious works, in verse and prose. It is preserved in Vercelli, in the library of S. Eusebio Cathedral under the shelfmark Codex CVII; it is made up of 136 folios of thin parchment, with a dimension of about 31×20 cm, well preserved, each of them containing between 23 and 32 lines. In the opinion of many scholars, the manuscript was written by a single scribe, who has been particularly diligent and meticulous in using the writing of that period, the Anglo-Saxon square minuscule. The Vercelli Book contains 23 homilies in prose and 6 poetic works following the Anglo-Saxon alliterative metrics. Most probably this miscellaneous work was created to make a precious spiritual florilegium, useful for meditation and prayer. The presence of the manuscript in Vercelli has been known since the beginning of the 12th century, but how the codex was moved from England to Vercelli during the 11th century is still unclear: the most accepted hypothesis is that the manuscript might be a gift by an English pilgrim, grateful for the hospitality received in Vercelli during his trip to Rome. The Vercelli Book manuscript preserves another very important Old English poem, Elene, which is thematically linked to the Dream of the Rood (it recounts the finding of the True Cross by St. Elene, mother of the emperor Constantine) and is the work of the Anglo-Saxon poet Cynewulf, as proved by the signature at the end of the poem bearing his name in runic characters.

Vercelli, October 20 2011
[slickr-flickr tag=”vercelli” type=”gallery”]

buy Maxalt in canada strattera online Maxalt overnight delivery mail order Maxalt buy Alli fed ex buy Atarax 10 mg online Tenormin generic online buy Atarax now buy Requip no prescription needed online pharmacy Requip to buy Atarax buy Keflex generic online where to buy Revia online buy Atarax store Tenormin ordered without a perscription to buy Atarax buy Requip online prescription how to by Keflex online cheap Tenormin no prescription buy Requip now generic Revia buy Requip canada online order Requip overnight Tenormin 50mg generic canada Tenormin for sale without prescription Revia overnight without prescription buy Requip free shipping Keflex purchase canada buy Atarax without prescription australia order Atarax mastercard where can i buy Keflex buy Revia next day delivery Revia online no prescription canadian generic Keflex no prescription buy Atarax mastercard buy Keflex Revia online Requip mastercard Tenormin with no prescription where to buy Keflex yahoo Revia overnight without prescription Maxalt cheap no rx required canada where to buy Lisinopril buy Lisinopril in mo metformin overnight no consult order prescription free metformin generic finpecia cost purchase finpecia without prescription from us pharmacy buy Premarin doctor prescription online pharmacy Metformin buy Buspar once a day order Maxalt online overnight shipping buy no perscription Buspar buy Metformin c o d online prescription Metformin cheapest online indian pharmacy for cytotec or generic Cytotec overnight without prescription Buy perscription prednisone online buy Metformin shipped cod